Chicago Style Book Bibliography Generator

What for Chicago Style Citation Generator Is Needed?

A good academic writing implies the usage of quotations. However, the words of other people are treated as plagiarism in case they are not properly cited. It is a real obstacle for many modern students to include in-text citations and bibliography in the way it should be. Besides, there are so many paper formats that one may get lost:

So, due t the fact using the ideas and thoughts of others without providing a due credit is considered plagiarism. A research paper or any other academic assignment should be written from scratch. In other words, the plagiarism checker should show that your essay is almost 100% original. Thus, academic market players realized the need of creating a convenient website where one can easily get correct bibliography for any type of work. Our innovation deals with all possible styles, but this time we wish to focus on Chicago referencing style as it is much more complicated than MLA or APA.

Manage Your Bibliography Using Citation Generator Chicago

In fact, students have to obey a number of different rules when writing in a particular style. For instance, they should mind margins, paragraphs, intervals, font, its size, and more. however, when it comes to referencing, students share that this is the worst nightmare.

Since this Chicago citation generator makes it simple to come up with citations (both in-text and references), there is no excuse to copy-paste any more. Every student or writer can design excellent bibliographies and acknowledge other people’s work with no problems now!  You may completely rely on our brand new Chicago style citation generator as it was introduced by professors from the world’s leading universities and advanced IT team.

Another reason to cite the ideas of other people with the help of accurate citation generator Chicago is rather ethical. Authors and artists should be awarded with credits from their readers or listeners. After all, the material you use for your paper enriches your knowledge. Besides, by setting up provenance students ensures his or her own work. The teacher will see how good a student is at conducting research and analyzing literature. Including works cited means selecting only the most critical and valuable thoughts from the obtained sources, so it’s not that easy. Only students with perfect research and analytical skills can do that. Selecting the quotes is not enough anyway. That is where our Chicago reference generator steps in.

Finally, in-text citations make it possible for the interested audience to delve deeper in the particular topic. It is your way to catch an eye of the reader. As far as good bibliography may encourage tutor to read your paper up to the end, it may impact your grade. If you want to have a positive impact, use this comfortable and user-friendly Chicago style reference generator.

How This Chicago Reference Generator Works?

You may wonder how the system works. You don’t need to type in anything manually – that’s the good news. There is also no need to read full and boring MLA or Chicago manual of style citation generator. Every nuance is already implemented in our system. It works like professional cleaning software for your computer: you simply go online and get what you want.

On the whole, the steps are really easy.

  1. Pick academic writing style (paper format) and search. When you conduct scientific research for your assigned paper, you meet hundreds or even thousands of books, journals, articles, videos, websites, or else. Different sources have to be cited in a different way. The absence of universal rules turns the process even more complicated. Unless your teacher provides you with the full list of literature to be used in a bibliographical format, you must solve this issue all alone. Or, you can go to our cite4me.org and receive an automatic Chicago manual style citation generator. It is very useful in case you don’t want to order entire essays from corresponding services, but you still lack the knowledge of referencing styles.
  2. Next, add the source you have chosen easily and go on. Add the selected source to references and don’t stop citing to carry out a complete list (a.k.a. reference page). Please check how many sources your tutor expects to see. Our automatic bibliography maker auto-fills. Keep it in mind when simply inserting the link to your book/movie/article.
  3. Simply download the prepared bibliography. You can have your bibliography in either the APA, MLA, Chicago styles.
  4. What is more important, unlike various essay writing and editing services, our website charges nothing. Every student can enjoy free Chicago citation generator. No need to worry about your cash any longer. All we want in return is your high grade. After using our system, students are able to cite whatever they want in any format. Moreover, they can come up with own Chicago manual style citation generator.

Don’t be an intellectual property stiller —save your reputation, use Cite4Me.Org and reward those who deserve credit for it.

Chicago Format Examples (16th Edition)

Carefully follow these examples when compiling and formatting both your in-text citations and bibliography in order to avoid losing marks for citing incorrectly.

I. Notes-Bibliography System

Each example in this section includes a numbered footnote, a shortened form of the note, and a corresponding bibliography entry.

Book with single author or editor:


  • Full Chicago citation in a footnote:

  • 5. Michael Pollan, The Omnivore’s Dilemma: A Natural History of Four Meals (New York: Penguin, 2006), 99-100.

  • Shortened citation in a footnote:

  • 5. Pollan, Omnivore’s Dilemma, 3.

  • Bibliography entry:

  • Pollan, Michael, The Omnivore’s Dilemma: A Natural History of Four Meals. New York: Penguin, 2006.

Book with multiple authors:

For a book with two authors, note that only the first-listed name is inverted in the bibliography entry.


  • Full Chicago style citation in a footnote:

  • 3. Geoffrey C. Ward and Ken Burns, The War: An Intimate History, 1941–1945 (New York: Knopf, 2007), 52.

  • Shortened citation in a footnote:

  • 3. Ward and Burns, War, 52.

  • Bibliography entry:

  • Ward, Geoffrey C., and Ken Burns. The War: An Intimate History, 1941–1945. New York: Knopf, 2007.

Print journal article:


  • Full Chicago citation in a footnote:

  • 89. Walter Blair, “Americanized Comic Braggarts,” Critical Inquiry 4, no. 2 (1977): 331-32.

  • Shortened citation in a footnote:

  • 89. Blair, “Americanized Comic Braggarts,” 335.

  • Bibliography entry:

  • Blair, Walter. “Americanized Comic Braggarts.” Critical Inquiry 4, no. 2 (1977): 331-49.

Online journal article:

When citing electronic sources consulted online, the Chicago style citation manual recommends including an electronic resource identifier, where possible, to lead your reader directly to the source.

A URL is a uniform resource locator, which directs the reader straight to the online source. When using a URL, simply copy the address from your browser’s address bar when viewing the article. You must include the source’s full publication information as well.


  • Full Chicago style citation in a footnote:

  • 12. Wilfried Karmaus and John F. Riebow, “Storage of Serum in Plastic and Glass Containers May Alter the Serum Concentration of Polychlorinated Biphenyls,” Environmental Health Perspectives 112 (May 2004): 645, http://www.jstor.org/stable/3435987.

  • Shortened citation in a footnote:

  • 12. Karmaus and Riebow, “Storage of Serum,” 645.

  • Bibliography entry:

  • Karmaus, Wilfried, and John F. Riebow. “Storage of Serum in Plastic and Glass Containers May Alter the Serum Concentration of Polychlorinated Biphenyls.” Environmental Health Perspectives 112 (May 2004): 643-647. http://www.jstor.org/stable/3435987.

DOI:

A DOI is a digital object identifier; a unique and permanent name assigned to a piece of intellectual property, such as a journal article, in any medium in which it is published. If it is available, a DOI is preferable to an ISBN.


  • Full Chicago citation in a footnote:

  • 3. William J. Novak, “The Myth of the ‘Weak’ American State,” American Historical Review 113 (June 2008): 758, doi:10.1086/ahr.113.3.752.

  • Shortened citation in a footnote:

  • 3. Novak, “Myth,” 770.

  • Bibliography entry:

  • Novak, William J. “The Myth of the ‘Weak’ American State,” American Historical Review 113 (June 2008): 752-72. doi:10.1086/ahr.113.3.752.

II. Author-Date System:

Each example in this section includes a Chicago style in-text citation and a corresponding reference list entry.

Article with single author or editor, author mentioned in text:


  • In-text citation:

  • Here we empirically demonstrate that workers’ and regulatory agents’ understandings of discrimination and legality emerge not only in the shadow of the law but also, as Albiston (2005) suggests…

  • Reference list entry:

  • Albiston, Catherine R. 2005. “Bargaining in the Shadow of Social Institutions: Competing Discourses and Social Change in the Workplace Mobilization of Civil Rights.” Law and Society Review 39 (1): 11-47.

Article with multiple authors, author not mentioned in text:


  • Chicago in-text citation:

  • As legal observers point out, much dispute resolution transpires outside the courtroom but in the “shadow of the law” (Mnookin and Kornhauser 1979)...

  • Reference list entry:

  • Mnookin, Robert, and Lewis Kornhauser. 1979. “Bargaining in the Shadow of the Law: The Case of Divorce.” Yale Law Journal 88 (5): 950-97.

*For a work with four or more authors, include all the authors in the reference list entry. However, in the in-text citation you need only cite the last name of the first-listed author, followed by et al. (e.g. Barnes et al. 2008, 118-19)

For more examples, see chapters 14 and 15 of the Chicago style citation handbook: The Chicago Manual of Style (Sixteenth Edition), or find more information available here.

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